News - Legacy of Hope Foundation
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News

Who is Liliana? Liliana is a two and a half year old who is full of life and spunk! She loves to be a ballerina, but also loves to horseplay. She loves to be the baby when the kids are playing house and have her sister carry her around. She keeps me busy and well-snuggled. How did Liliana come to live at Legacy of Hope? Lili's biological mother is mentally-ill. She gave birth on a toilet in the public hospital and left her on the floor. Due to the unsanitary conditions of her birth, she had medical problems from the start. A couple hours after they released her to us she had a febrile seizure and had to return the the hospital. She was diagnosed with a septic infection and stayed a few more weeks in the hospital. She was released to us a second time and stayed with the Spangler family for...

Helping to change the perspective toward orphan care in Honduras has been a struggle.  For decades the Western church as answered the cry of the orphan by building large residential centers and orphanages.  Over time, this well-intentioned response has caused the local population to feel that it is not their responsibility to care for the fatherless and sadly, even paved the way for child abandonment in some cases when loving parents believe they are choosing a better life for their child by leaving them at an orphanage.   However, at Legacy of Hope we are working to change that perspective by empowering the local church to understand and accept their responsibility to care for the orphan and the oppressed. We do that by modeling the role of a foster family and encouraging families and individuals to use their gifts and talents be the difference in the life of a child.  Although...

Erika has worked with Legacy of Hope Foundation now for about three years, and it has been amazing to watch her grow as an employee and as a person. When I first came to Legacy of Hope foundation, Erika was working at the Spangler’s house as a foster mom to Kaleb and also as an employee within Legacy of Hope. I remember watching her run from place to place, making sure everyone was doing what they needed to be doing, playing with the kids, and loving Kaleb with everything she had in her. I left Legacy of Hope in the summer of 2015 and returned soon after in January of 2016. Ericka was still here at Legacy of Hope, but now working as a Transition House  employee with Rachel Roberts and continuing her role as foster mom. I remember being amazed at her flexibility to change positions within the work place...

If you’ve heard about Honduras, chances are the things you’ve heard are either bad or related to your cruise stop in Roatán. But probably mostly bad. It’s true that Honduras as a whole is known as the most dangerous country in the world because it has the highest murder rate per capita. When you look more specifically at the most dangerous cities in the world, its two biggest cities sit at numbers 3 and 4, beat only by Caracas and Acapulco. Backpackers avoid it on their travels through Central America, airports often force you to have a return ticket at the ready, and mothers worry for their children that move there (sorry mom ;)). But this outlook is only the smallest piece of what makes up the reality of Honduras. After a decade in which the country spiraled into a whirlwind of terrible violence, Honduras has definitely begun an upward journey. This...

The honor and privilege of caring for children who were once orphaned, abandoned, or vulnerable comes with the responsibility of competently caring for their unique needs amidst the tremendous joys and great challenges that accompany day-to-day life.  Trauma has the potential to profoundly impact a child’s development in all areas, altering the child’s biology, beliefs, and behavior.  In order to equip those in caregiving roles to stand in the gap between hurt and healing, the staff and volunteers at Legacy of Hope Foundation spent the month of July learning together how to promote healing and restoration in the lives of the children we are serving. Back2Back Ministries developed the training called “Becoming a Trauma Competent Caregiver (TCC).”  TCC provides caregivers with the tools they need to be more than just compassionate for the children they are serving.  Caregivers are equipped with tools that allow them to serve as competently compassionate caregivers....

Last month, Marianne penned a beautiful narrative about our experience hosting the First Lady of Honduras, a truly once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. The reason for hosting her was because we were publicly signing an agreement to provide crisis care services to children in an official capacity, and with that agreement comes grant money. Marianne also mentioned in that article that we didn’t just start providing those services that day, but had been doing so in an unofficial capacity for almost 2 years. In many ways, the crisis care center has grown into our flagship program, having now cared for over 200 children over that time. But back when we started, we had no idea of the impact or even where all of the funds would come from. And herein lies the quandary that every leader of a faith-based nonprofit, especially those based abroad, faces. Everyday, you probably ask yourself a specific question within...

"Okay, kids," directed Ashlyn in her usual boss-of-everyone role, "It's time to say your prayers and go to bed." The others willingly complied, as they are familiar with these daily life events. Ashlyn instructed them in folding their hands and closing their eyes, and led them in a little prayer. "Okay, now it's time for high-fives and kisses," she said as she went around to the four other toddlers to cover them in a blanket as they lay "sleeping" on the living room floor. As I watched what had just transpired, my eyes welled up (as they do a lot these days). They were modeling a family. Each member had an important role to play whether it was putting the little ones to bed, making the dinner or keeping the general peace for the sake of the longevity of their game. They were internalizing what they were seeing everyday--a healthy family...

Tuesday, July 25, 2017 12:30 PM CST The day had almost arrived.  We’d spent months planning for this, and even longer debating whether it was something we should even do in the first place.  But 4 home makeovers, a couple new bank accounts, 2 extra employees and countless hours of legal document revisions later, we were finally ready. Following the inevitable 11th hour flurry of activity, which included small repairs, painting, expanding activity space and reorganization of supplies, the first wave of DINAF (Honduras child services) employees came from the capital city to tour our facilities.  One worker noted the difference in the children who are cared for here.  “In most places the children run to me and hug my leg.  They beg me to take them with me.  But here the children are happy, content and attached to their caregivers.  They know that they are safe.  It is a beautiful thing.”  The...

As a ministry we are always looking for locals who are willing to step into the lives of vulnerable children here at Legacy of Hope. We believe this is one of the essential steps to becoming a holistic ministry. One of the things Legacy of Hope strives for is to work with excellence in everything we do, which includes becoming more culturally aware. Something I love about Legacy of Hope is that American and Honduran culture is mixed. We have Honduran staff and American volunteers, Honduran and American children, and all holidays are celebrated in both cultures. The ministry is vibrant and full of life as Hondurans and Americans join together to make Legacy of Hope Foundation the ministry is it today. With over 10 staff members and volunteers, we would like to share the story of one in particular. Flor Gomez has been working with us for almost a...

“Look at me in my princess!” Brenda said as she gleefully twirled around to give the room a good look at her ballet uniform. Here, a princess dress is anything with a skirt, and the princesses were wearing them proudly. One by one, we lifted these six little ballerinas into the truck to head to their first day of ballet classes at the local bilingual school.  It was such a beneficial growing experience for them to be in a class setting in the community and outside of the familiarity of the ministry. For most of them, it was their first time being “dropped off” in a situation like that. They were scared and upset at the beginning, but within a couple weeks they were loving it and asking everyday if it was time to go to ballet. After a few months of weekly classes, the school put on a dance recital...